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Night School at the Old Boston City Hospital: Show me the ECG, Syncope in the ED.

There are only a few things I know about the world. Sunrise in the east, sunset in the west. Death and taxes. Cheese is definitely ok to toss on to your baby in a high chair, but probably not ok... Continue Reading →

Night School at the Old Boston City Hospital: Discharging Chest Pain Patients Without Suffering A Heart Attack (You Or Them)

There are only a few things I know about the world. Sunrise in the east, sunset in the west. Death and taxes. Black Friday at one time referred to a SINGLE day that came immediately after Thanksgiving. TL:DR – HEART... Continue Reading →

Go for the WIN!

Wire-In-Needle (WIN) Technique for Ultrasound-Guided Central Venous Catheterization. Advancing CVC placement safety, speed and success with real-time ultrasound guidance.

Night School: ‘Roid Rant

By: Dr. Steve McGuire  Night School at the Old Boston City Hospital: ‘Roid Rant – On the ED use of Steroids.   There are only a few things I know about the world. Sunrise in the east, sunset in the west.... Continue Reading →

An Approach to Access in Trauma Room Patients

By: Dan Resnick-Ault, MD At Boston City EM, tradition is alive and well in the resuscitation bays, where obtaining vascular access is delegated to a PGY-1 or 2 while an emergency medicine (EM) senior resident ‘runs’ the case (supervised by an... Continue Reading →

The Many Paths to Critical Care Fellowship

By: Dr. Travis Manasco and Dr. Matthew Tyler Over the past 5-10 years, critical care has become a popular fellowship choice after emergency medicine (EM) residency training.  Many EM physicians enjoy performing procedures and taking care of critically ill patients.... Continue Reading →

Palliative Care in the Emergency Department: Yes, We Can & Yes, We Should

By: Drs. Gips, Jaworski, and Zametkin Case: An 82 year-old female with a past medical history of HTN, DM, CAD and cardiomyopathy with multiple recent admissions presents with shortness of breath. The patient had been admitted one week prior, during which... Continue Reading →

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